See the rare super blue blood moon from Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles January 31

Featured image: Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, California (photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Griffith Observatory is opening the grounds tomorrow morning, January 31, for a rare celestial treat: a super blue blood moon. That’s when a supermoon, blue moon, and total lunar eclipse coincide.

The last super blue blood moon was December 30, 1982, and the next one—after tomorrow—will be January 31, 2037.

A total lunar eclipse happens when the moon passes into the Earth’s shadow, where it’s blocked from direct sunlight. This casts a red glow on the moon’s surface, turning it into a blood moon.

A blue moon is the second full moon of the month. This time, the moon’s orbit brings it closer to Earth, which makes it appear bigger and brighter (hence the name, supermoon).

Griffith Observatory is located in Griffith Park at 2800 East Observatory Road in Los Angeles. The Vermont and Western Canyon entrances into the park open at 3:30 a.m., and parking will be free until noon.

Personal telescopes and lawn furniture are not allowed; blankets are OK.

Take a look the full lunar eclipse viewing schedule at Griffith Observatory.

Griffith Observatory will cancel the viewing if rain is in the forecast. Check for weather updates on Griffith Observatory’s home page.

If you aren’t in Los Angeles on January 31 or conditions are too cloudy to see the total lunar eclipse from your location, you can livestream it.

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